Revival Sermons

Lifestyle & Contemporary Issues => Issues in Contemporary Worship => Topic started by: Hounddog on January 31, 2016, 08:46:28 PM

Title: Prayer meeting
Post by: Hounddog on January 31, 2016, 08:46:28 PM
What is a good format to follow for prayer meeting?

Is it better to have one leader for consistency, or can you be jumping back and forth between leaders? I ask because our church pastor, who has several churches to look after, cannot make all meetings, but wants to run the ones he is able to attend.
Title: Re: Prayer meeting
Post by: Ed Sutton on January 31, 2016, 11:54:07 PM
Have two prayer meetings .

1. traditional one for the sermonette + 3-5 min's generic prayer, anyone leads when pastor is gone.

2. Men's & Women's intercessory prayer groups, that meet to intercede in prayer, for each church member and extended family, and local neighborhood, and to receive the early rain and start getting fitted up for the loud cry. And discussing and interceding for church needs in prayer.   Same non pastor local church member male for the men's group, and woman for women's group.  Pastors generally morph prayer groups from intercessory groups praying toward goals, into study sermonette gatherings with a small amount of generic prayer by them. That's why I stress creating two groups with those two different goals.

Praying together joins hearts, Satan takes advantage of that fact, therefore two gender separated intercessory prayer groups.  At first ask God who to invite, build a core group, then invite anyone of that gender in the church, even visitors it they are recurrent.

I lead the men's prayer group at our local church, my wife leads the women's group.  When it grows big enough create smaller groups in homes closer to groups of members, train leaders to lead those smaller satellite groups.
Title: Re: Prayer meeting
Post by: newbie on February 01, 2016, 07:54:36 AM
are male and female to be separated?
Title: Re: Prayer meeting
Post by: Ed Sutton on February 01, 2016, 04:48:35 PM
In the group praying together joins hearts, Satan takes advantage of that fact, it's like soldiers in battle together, loyalties are built.  Would you want your husband to build deep loyalties to some other woman in a prayer group, and Satan advantage that fact and he leave you for her ? 

Men's brain wiring is different than female brain wiring, and the genders look at things differently, men seek solutions, women seek relationships and feelings .  Have you tried getting a group of men and women to see eye to eye about agreeing on something, recently ?

Men with men, and women with women, is easier, and women can speak more freely among women than if a man or men are part of the group.   Often the same with men.   segregation is not intrinsic to prayer success, but in these last days it's logistically easier and safer. 

At home and in the sermonette style meeting plus short group prayer, spouses are together,church folks are together, this type of group is not an intense intercessory group, discussing private subjects behind closed doors and praying.
Title: Re: Prayer meeting
Post by: Hounddog on February 01, 2016, 06:32:32 PM
In the group praying together joins hearts, Satan takes advantage of that fact, it's like soldiers in battle together, loyalties are built.  Would you want your husband to build deep loyalties to some other woman in a prayer group, and Satan advantage that fact and he leave you for her ?

I am not so sure that there is anything for Satan to take advantage of. In a group, people are praying public prayers, a number of people are present, etc. If this was two people praying together in private, you might have a point. I can't imagine the kind of prayer that would be publicly said that could lead to irresistible temptations.

You might even take it a bit further and just say sitting in the same pew with a female you are not married to is Satan territory. Some religions do that. Orthodox Jews will often not sit together with the opposite sex even with their wives.

Reality is, if you are susceptible to immorality, there are far greater opportunities than prayer meeting.
Title: Re: Prayer meeting
Post by: Raven on February 02, 2016, 04:08:42 AM
If we're not careful we could be come like the Amish, with men on one side of the church and women on the other.  :roll:

Men and women complement each other (not to be confused with compliment).  We see things in different ways and much can be gained by hearing the various perspectives presented by both men and women at these meetings.  Our best prayer meetings were when the pastor would read a short bit of Scripture, have a few comments and then open it up for prayer requests, stories of blessings received, and so on.  Then whoever wanted to could pray.  One could not help but receive a blessing, whether they prayed or just listened to the others.

Ad far as men and women seeing eye to eye, it depends on the group, of course.  20 years ago we had contentious board meetings, and gender was not the determining factor in the contentions.  Today we have harmony in our board meetings, with good input from both men and women.

Our Conference has women's retreats and men's retreats.  I gave up going off with the guys when I got married.  If I can't take my wife, I'm not interested in going to a retreat.
Title: Re: Prayer meeting
Post by: Ed Sutton on February 02, 2016, 08:03:51 AM
believe what you want.  I don't want to discuss private guy stuff with a woman present, and vice versa I am sure they don't either.
Title: Re: Prayer meeting
Post by: Raven on February 02, 2016, 09:24:33 AM
believe what you want.  I don't want to discuss private guy stuff with a woman present, and vice versa I am sure they don't either.

I didn't know that's what prayer meeting was for.  I believe private personal issues should be dealt with somewhere else.  A  private meeting with the pastor and elders would be appropriate for men, and with some of the deaconesses, and maybe the pastor's wife for women.
Title: Re: Prayer meeting
Post by: newbie on February 02, 2016, 10:37:08 AM
Ed,
We do a circle of prayer in which all are joined together and each takes a turn...is this wrong then?
Title: Re: Prayer meeting
Post by: Ed Sutton on February 03, 2016, 07:49:02 AM
Nope not wrong at all.
Title: Re: Prayer meeting
Post by: Hounddog on February 03, 2016, 04:43:12 PM
believe what you want.  I don't want to discuss private guy stuff with a woman present, and vice versa I am sure they don't either.
I didn't know that's what prayer meeting was for.  I believe private personal issues should be dealt with somewhere else.  A  private meeting with the pastor and elders would be appropriate for men, and with some of the deaconesses, and maybe the pastor's wife for women.

I agree that private guy stuff is not fit for a corporate prayer meeting. If you need to have a prayer partner for such information, which may be too much for everyone else, then find someone such as a pastor, elder, or even Christian counselor who can aid you with these issues. One should keep in mind that sharing "private guy stuff" may even be something that another is struggling with and could be a stumbling block for that person. One needn't look much further and see the effects on priests who listened to sins confessed from parishioners and how it affected their own personal lives. I might say that having no segregation during public prayer meeting would be one way to keep what is too much information for some people in check.

My personal interest in prayer meeting would be more in the line of the church body praying for the Holy Spirit to assist in witnessing to the community. Of course, some prayer for the members is also appropriate. Witnessing to the community of the goodness of God should be the primary purpose to even have a church.
Title: Re: Prayer meeting
Post by: ColporteurK on February 03, 2016, 05:17:29 PM
Ed,
We do a circle of prayer in which all are joined together and each takes a turn...is this wrong then?

I always feel uneasy when people join hands in a circle and we are expected to link up.. Although Mrs. White speaks a fair amount about the family circle it seems more figurative than literal. Has anyone read where the church pioneers joined hands in a circle to pray. If I'm not mistaken the joining hands in a circle is used by those in the occult. It is as though there is a sense that power and energy is transferred  this way. Do  you think my concern is unfounded ?
Title: Re: Prayer meeting
Post by: Raven on February 03, 2016, 05:47:13 PM
I'm with you, cp, although I've never associated with the occult, and I don't think those promoting it attach any mystical power to it.  I think they're trying to promote togetherness, unity.  I'm just not much of a touchy-feely guy, I guess.  And it also seems odd to be holding hands with a woman who isn't my wife.
Title: Re: Prayer meeting
Post by: Raven on February 03, 2016, 05:51:27 PM


One should keep in mind that sharing "private guy stuff" may even be something that another is struggling with and could be a stumbling block for that person.  One needn't look much further and see the effects on priests who listened to sins confessed from parishioners and how it affected their own personal lives.


This is one thing that concerned me when the "small group" fad was making the rounds.  I stayed away from it, but many got right into it.  Part of the idea was to be "vulnerable" with others to create empathy for each other.  There are better ways of achieving that goal.  There's a danger in being too intimate with people who are not members of one's immediate family.
Title: Re: Prayer meeting
Post by: Hounddog on February 03, 2016, 06:33:25 PM
I'm with you, cp, although I've never associated with the occult, and I don't think those promoting it attach any mystical power to it....

You really got me curious regarding the occult and a quick search did bring up the occult connection. I am not really ready to denounce the hand holding circles, because we also keep other formerly pagan traditions and no one seems to think it is important. However, I have never been impressed by hand holding prayer circles and a number of other things people do all the time.

CHRISTIANS PRAYING IN A CIRCLE: WHERE DID IT ORIGINATE?

1999, Ed Tarkowski published a four-part study on prayer circles, a practice that was, at the time, just gaining popularity in some Christian churches. While the study is full of useful information on the origins of such rituals, it’s extremely interesting to read the study 15 years later.

Prayer circles have a long history of use among pagans, witches, and other occult practitioners.  But the use of the prayer circle in Christianity, like so many other modern rituals, practices and doctrines, can be traced to the American apostate church.

In 1999, Tarkowski noticed the increased use of prayer circles by Christians, but he also noticed that Christians were late-comers to the prayer circle game.  Others had used these circles for decades–sometimes centuries.


http://endtimesprophecyreport.com/2014/05/06/prayer-circles-another-pagan-practice-in-the-church/
Title: Re: Prayer meeting
Post by: newbie on February 03, 2016, 07:40:21 PM
our circle of prayer is a bit spread out and we are all on our knees and not holding hands...
Title: Re: Prayer meeting
Post by: Larry Lyons on February 04, 2016, 08:56:14 PM
One of the reasons I don't like it is that in a way similar to the dreadful "greeting" that some churches do, people feel intimidated into participating in something they are not comfortable with. IMO the "greeting" is a fake display of friendliness and joining hands in prayer is a fake display of "bonding." "Bonding" is another annoying word that is misused. (IMHO)  :-D
Title: Re: Prayer meeting
Post by: Raven on February 05, 2016, 07:07:18 AM
I'm with you 100% on this one, Larry.

"Meet and Greet"  :roll: seems to have been laid to rest for the most part in our church, now that the biggest proponent of it spends her winters in a warmer place, and is rarely in a position to instigate it when she's here.  With our current pastor, I don't think it will come back, as he's particularly concerned about proper reverence in the sanctuary, something which "meet and greet" does not foster.
Title: Re: Prayer meeting
Post by: newbie on February 05, 2016, 01:50:40 PM
we just let it come naturally...  some people are just natural greeters and we let them do whatever they want to make people feel comfortable in our little church...

the forced greeting:  we were visiting a large church not too far from us once and they had a 5 minute greeting time announced and when it was almost over, the lady in front of me said, "this is the best part of the service"... I just chuckled inside... and thought, oh boy what's coming next?
Title: Re: Prayer meeting
Post by: V. Hahn on February 06, 2016, 03:40:26 PM
I think it's nice to smile, and quietly and reverently acknowledge people when coming into the sanctuary, but I don't believe it is a place for free-for-all greetings where everyone stands up and it is a cacophony of noise in the sanctuary.  I always stay seated during those times, but will, of course, shake the hands that are offered to me.  The foyer should be the place for this type of thing, not the sanctuary, which is a holy place to worship God. 

Though I don't think I should, I have fallen into quiet conversations before and after the service, but I think I am at fault for this and should save it for outside the sanctuary.

I just had a funny memory about prayer circles…

When I was growing up my family (my parents, my two brothers, and I) would very often stand or kneel, holding hands in a circle, and pray after family worship and other times.  After we prayed, we would always hug and kiss each family member.  I love that memory.

But then whenever I was with another group…whether it be with friends, or a church, school, or other group--I had an overwhelming desire to run around to hug and kiss everyone.  I had to mentally remind myself, "Vicki, you don't have to kiss these people."   :joy:
Title: Re: Prayer meeting
Post by: newbie on February 06, 2016, 04:26:52 PM
 :-)  sweet
Title: Re: Prayer meeting
Post by: Raven on February 07, 2016, 04:01:58 AM
I think it's nice to smile, and quietly and reverently acknowledge people when coming into the sanctuary, but I don't believe it is a place for free-for-all greetings where everyone stands up and it is a cacophony of noise in the sanctuary.  I always stay seated during those times, but will, of course, shake the hands that are offered to me.  The foyer should be the place for this type of thing, not the sanctuary, which is a holy place to worship God. 



I'm with you 100% on this,  Vicki.  I do the same thing when this occurs.  Fortunately, it hasn't happened in a long time, and, as I said earlier, I'm pretty sure our current pastor would strongly discourage it.

I'm afraid our people, to a great extent, seem to have forgotten what reverence means.  Our pastor has tried to foster reverence whenever he can.  If only this could be done at campmeeting.  :roll:  We have a small regional campmeeting in northern Maine, and they know about reverence.  The state at the beginning and remind the people from time to time during the week, that they are "old-fashioned," and that if one is blessed by a musical number or something else, a hearty "amen!" is to be preferred over applause.  I never once  heard applause at that campmeeting--unlike the main Conference campmeeting in Freeport.
Title: Re: Prayer meeting
Post by: Hounddog on February 07, 2016, 11:19:58 AM
I think it's nice to smile, and quietly and reverently acknowledge people when coming into the sanctuary, but I don't believe it is a place for free-for-all greetings where everyone stands up and it is a cacophony of noise in the sanctuary.  I always stay seated during those times, but will, of course, shake the hands that are offered to me.  The foyer should be the place for this type of thing, not the sanctuary, which is a holy place to worship God. 

I, due to my choice of careers, had back problems for years. One time in one of those free-for-all greets, and when I was newly recovering from another back injury, someone decided to be extra boisterous in one of those greets and grab my hand to try and drag me into the aisle in an effort to help me get in the spirit of things. I was not happy and had to forcefully tell him to "LET GO OF MY HAND!" Unfortunately, I spent the rest of the service standing up and walking in the foyer to get over the pain and the remainder of the afternoon I was under the influence of pain meds and muscle relaxants. Needless to say, I stayed a little further away from an aisle seat in the future and was careful of who I shook hands with. Unfortunately, the "someone" was the head elder.

People often are not aware of the physical conditions of others all the way to how hard they squeeze the hands of those who suffer from arthritis. Because someone appears well, does not mean they are. People need to really look at those around them for their level of comfort. Aggressive glad-handing really does not belong in church.

I never cared for those types of greetings as they were to me forced and phony. If people were not going to greet you earlier, why was this any more genuine?
Title: Re: Prayer meeting
Post by: Ed Sutton on February 07, 2016, 10:52:16 PM
I second that, and remember when one or the other shoulder was freshly injured, no pumping handshakes then either.  Then what about cold and flu season, how many saints wash their hands often enough or properly, and spread greetings that keep on giving ?

I notice the spiritual temperature before, during, and after such greetings are called for and occur.  To my view things spiritually chill and degenerate during and afterward, it is an opportunity for the focus to become a "me" thing again and usher The Holy Spirit out to the foyer. Often He does not return.