Revival Sermons

Studies in the Word => Difficult Bible Texts => Topic started by: Ed Sutton on June 16, 2015, 06:11:27 AM

Title: let the dead bury their dead
Post by: Ed Sutton on June 16, 2015, 06:11:27 AM
"   let the dead bury their dead  "

Could this mean ? - " let the spiritually dead tares and foolish virgins, stay behind, and bury the physically dead who may be sleeping in Jesus."

foolish virgins =     Let no one feel inclined to hide his light. Those who hide their light so that the world may not distinguish between them and those who walk in darkness will soon lose all power to diffuse light. They are the ones who are represented by the five foolish virgins, and when the crisis comes, when the call is heard "Behold, the bridegroom cometh; go ye out to meet him" (Matthew 25:6), they will arouse at last to find that their lamps have gone out, that they have mixed with the elements of the world and have not provided themselves with the oil of grace.....  {TMK 215.2}   


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  When Jesus was asked the question, Art thou the Son of God? He knew that to answer in the affirmative would make His death certain; a denial would leave a stain upon His humanity. There was a time to be silent, and a time to speak. He had not spoken until plainly interrogated. In His lessons to His disciples He had declared: "Whosoever therefore shall confess me before men, him will I confess also before my Father which is in heaven." When challenged, Jesus did not deny His relationship with God. In that solemn moment His character was at stake and must be vindicated. He left on that occasion an example for man to follow under similar circumstances. He would teach him not to apostatize from his faith to escape suffering or even death. {TMK 214.4}   

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   There have been and always will be tares among the wheat, the foolish virgins with the wise, those who have no oil in their vessels with their lamps. ........ {ST, October 23, 1879 par. 10}   

What do you understand from SOP & Scripture ? 
Title: Re: let the dead bury their dead
Post by: ColporteurK on June 16, 2015, 06:19:03 AM
  I wish I would have kept the study that  Doug Bachelor had on this. He had reason to believe ( I think given the Greek) that the person that said that was merely making an excuse not to come and that the dead he was talking about was not even dead yet. I don't remember how he concluded that. I remember however, that it was an interesting study.

It seems a little odd that Jesus would tell a loving, caring person not to bury their dead father or mother. Would a day or two or a week really be that big of a deal ? However, if this was just a put off,  an excuse, and if the relative was not even dead but merely ill, then this would make perfect sense.

This kind of makes me think of SDAs that say, "I will not be able to teach the lesson next Sabbath. I have relatives coming to visit and will not be at church."
Title: Re: let the dead bury their dead
Post by: Ed Sutton on June 16, 2015, 07:04:49 AM
I think you said that to plow a straight row, look at the same point on the horizon, and plow straight to there.   Plowing and stopping or swerving messes up the row and decreases the yield of the field overall. 

Looking at the mission and don't make excuses about the hurdles, find God's promises and solutions to accomplish the mission without swerving or stopping.   Recognize that only God can resurrect the dry bones, leave them alone, follow Jesus , and keep plowing in a straight line toward Him, is basically what I currently understand from it.
Title: Re: let the dead bury their dead
Post by: Larry Lyons on June 16, 2015, 10:59:06 AM
I have wondered about that statement and I tend to think that the words "bury my father" was a figure of speech and  was understood to mean that his father was not necessarily dead or even dying. It was an excuse to not to give up  his own plans for his life and follow Jesus.
Title: Re: let the dead bury their dead
Post by: newbie on June 18, 2015, 12:58:31 AM
I have wondered about that statement and I tend to think that the words "bury my father" was a figure of speech and  was understood to mean that his father was not necessarily dead or even dying. It was an excuse to not to give up  his own plans for his life and follow Jesus.
This is what Ken Hart said on The Ox.
Title: Re: let the dead bury their dead
Post by: Raven on June 18, 2015, 04:01:55 AM
That's more or less what the SDA Bible Commentary says, too.  It makes sense.
Title: Re: let the dead bury their dead
Post by: Ed Sutton on June 18, 2015, 07:03:00 AM
Could the first group of the dead - that Jesus is referring to - be the spiritually dead ?

If the first group of dead can bury, is it possible the second group is literally helpless, literally physically dead and unable to bury themselves, that the first group refuses to follow Him and choose spiritual death?  There are 3 groups.  Those that follow, the first dead group and the second dead group.

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  Calls came to us from Europe for help. We sent you the ablest man in all our ranks; but you have not appreciated the sacrifice we made in thus doing. We needed Elder Andrews here. But we thought his great caution, his experience, his God-fearing dignity in the desk, would be just what you needed. We hoped you would accept his counsel, and aid him in every way possible while he was a stranger in a strange country. But he has had to make his way himself, while you have stood by to question and cast doubts in reference to his suggestions and plans, when you were unprepared to take hold yourselves and move the car of truth onward.  {16MR 324.1} 

     Your means have been supplied by the American brethren; but it is not for your best good to let it remain thus. Many of you can do much if you have a willing mind. You are losing much by standing back and casting hindrances in the way of God's servants. You manifest a spirit of independence to carry out your own way and follow your own plans. Many of us hold back the arm of infinite power when Jesus stands ready to help us in all our wants, because we are desirous of being helped in our own way rather than in God's way. God chooses instruments to do His work of mercy in the salvation of man; but infinite mercy waits for the consent of human hearts, and the help of human hands, to make the work wholly beneficial to them. If those professing to be Christ's followers will not exercise the power and ability God has given them, the work which might have been accomplished will remain undone.  {16MR 324.2} 

     Jesus might have spoken the word at the grave of Lazarus, and the stone would have rolled away. He could bid the mountains depart and the hills remove, and they would obey His voice. But He stands before the sepulcher as one of the weakest of all that company, and says to His disciples, "Take ye away the stone." He does not propose to exhibit His divine power unless the feeblest, the most helpless and afflicted, shall show their interest and faith by their works, and thus prepare the way. As the mighty Lifegiver is about to perform His crowning miracle, the faith of the afflicted ones fails them. Objections are urged, and hindrances are presented. Their limited faith and short vision suggest impossibilities. They dread the revolting sight of decay which will meet their eyes. "Too late," says unbelief. "He has been dead four days, and the body is corrupted."  {16MR 325.1} 

     The stone is not moved by feeble humanity, but still bars the way to Christ's work. A word from Christ could cast it into the depths of the sea, but He waits for man, finite man, to prepare His way. Jesus reasons with them, and again requests them to submit their wills to His will, and let Him help them in His own way. "Take ye away the stone," is the requirement which Christ has made, and which must be obeyed before Christ shall work for them. {16MR 325.2} 

     The stone is finally rolled away. Now man has done all that was required of him, and the way is prepared for Christ to do His work. The Prince of life calls for the kingdom of death to give up its captive and permit this new subject to return to life. He commands, the dead obeys His voice, and Lazarus awakes to full consciousness.  {16MR 326.1} 

     Now, again, human hands can do something. Jesus bids them loose the bands, unwind the sheet which is wrapped about Lazarus' body, and let the ransomed-from-the-grave go. This request is quickly obeyed, and Lazarus is one among them again, free from every taint of disease.  {16MR 326.2} 

     It is upon similar conditions that Jesus still performs His mighty works for man. There is much for human hands and human faith to do before those who are bound in death-like slumber, in carnal security, shall be reached by the voice of the Son of God, and those who hear shall live.  {16MR 326.3} 

     Jesus has stood in your midst in Switzerland, in assemblies and congregations, ready to speak the life-giving word and make the spiritually dead alive by His power; but He has been hindered in this work by your questionings and doubts. Your jealousies, your suggestions, have many of them been prompted by a disposition to have your own way and will. You entreated the Lord to send you help. He heard your cry and came to your relief by sending His servants. And He has been waiting for you to roll away the stone of unbelief from the door of your own hearts before He can do His work. {16MR 326.4} 
Title: Re: let the dead bury their dead
Post by: newbie on June 18, 2015, 09:17:09 AM
That's more or less what the SDA Bible Commentary says, too.  It makes sense.
otherwise it would seem insensitive of Jesus to not let the man take care of his family...
I've always thought spiritually dead would apply here too...
could it be both?
do we have any Hebrew scholars here?
Title: Re: let the dead bury their dead
Post by: ColporteurK on June 18, 2015, 10:07:15 AM
   It sounds to me that "spiritually dead" if a secondary application would also attach to the first application.

In other words, if the man is just making an excuse and his father is not even dead, then this would not be insensitive at all.

 It might have been ,"I see through your lame excuse and there is no one to bury so let someone else deal with your makeshift obligation ." 

A young boy is told by his father to come in and take a nap. The boy replies, " I can't do that. I have to mow the lawn." The father responds", "let the lawn mow itself." While that may seem like father is being irresponsible regarding the lawn the truth is that he sees through the put off and there is something more pressing at hand. The lawn will be dealt with as father sees fit and he is not buying the excuse.