Revival Sermons

Studies in the Word => Practical counsel from the book of James => Topic started by: Richard OFfill on October 20, 2009, 07:18:51 PM

Title: James chapter 1
Post by: Richard OFfill on October 20, 2009, 07:18:51 PM
In a Bible Concordance look up the meaning of 'Temptations'. How can we put this into plain language? (This will make more sense when you have read the chapter. (hint, hint :-))
Title: Re: James chapter 1
Post by: Slingshot on October 21, 2009, 05:24:24 AM
Don't have a concordance at the office!
Title: Re: James chapter 1
Post by: Richard OFfill on October 21, 2009, 10:24:09 AM
Try The Blue Letter Bible on line. A free download is Online Bible.
Title: Re: James chapter 1
Post by: newbie on October 21, 2009, 11:45:59 AM
Don't have a concordance at the office!

I use this one:

http://www.blueletterbible.org/search/translationResults.cfm?Criteria=temptations&t=KJV&sf=5

Title: Re: James chapter 1
Post by: Richard OFfill on October 23, 2009, 03:45:38 AM
The words 'double minded' are interesting. Maybe wishy-washy, on again, off again, the new years resolution to have morning worship that never happens? Sadly for most of us the spiritual life is full of well intentions. I pray for spiritual stability, for spiritual consistency.
Title: Re: James chapter 1
Post by: Raven on October 23, 2009, 10:49:43 AM
The clue as to what "temptations" means in the context of James 1:2, is found in the next verse:  "the trying of your faith worketh patience."  So these "temptations" are to test our faith.  Later in the chapter James says that God tempts no one, so a better translation of the word in verse 2 might be "trials."

What kind of wisdom is James talking about in verse 5?  It must be the wisdom spoken of so often by Solomon.  It must have to do with spiritual things primarily, rather than worldly.  However someone who is wise in the spiritual realm would most likely be wise in everyday life also.

When I think of "double minded" in this context I think of someone whose "faith" is "strong" when things are going well, but who becomes easily discouraged when adversity comes.  Sort of like the stony ground hearer in the parable of the sower.

I find verses 14 and 15 interesting.  Isn't it true that we often don't need the devil's help when it comes to temptations?  We are quite often our own worst enemies.

I don't want to get ahead of what you're trying to do with this thread, Pastor, but I do like the book of James.  Verse 22 is interesting.  What do those who say "only believe and you're in the door" do with this text?  It quite clearly calls for action on the part of the believer.  James develops this idea further later in the epistle.
Title: Re: James chapter 1
Post by: GraceVessel on October 23, 2009, 05:16:52 PM
I think life is always on the edge as a Christian... we are constantly changing out habits... to come into line with what God has shown us thru life's trials, our personal reading of His word, and also just plain ole life experience.

My thoughts about Moses spending alot of time caring for sheep... look what it prepared him for...  same with Joseph... a cheerful disposition and a committed willingness to be the best in all aspects of life to bring glory to God.

I think sometimes we look at the 28F or the Ten Commandments as injunctions that "limit" out behavior... they are quite different actuall... pillars of stability that keep us focused on the goal at hand...

with kind regards,

Gracevessel
Title: Re: James chapter 1
Post by: Ed Sutton on October 23, 2009, 06:11:36 PM
James 1:1-7

1
Title: Re: James chapter 1
Post by: Tammy on October 23, 2009, 07:23:06 PM
I am having trouble wrapping my head around the relationship between being double-minded (v. 8) and a person who wavers (v. 6).  If I ask God for wisdom and don't have absolute faith that He will grant it to me, then I am wavering, don't have much faith.  The Bible commentary says that double-minded "describes the waverer of v. 6," and then says that the "mind is divided between the call of earthly pleasures and the call of unswerving loyalty to God."  I don't get the connection between that and having little faith.
Title: Re: James chapter 1
Post by: Tammy on October 23, 2009, 07:32:50 PM
From v. 5 & 6 I sort of get the picture of a person who is really trying to do what is right but just hasn't gotten totally to where they need to be yet (if their faith isn't really strong).  But in v. 8 "unstable in all his ways" just sounds like a bad person.
Title: Re: James chapter 1
Post by: Raven on October 24, 2009, 03:24:12 AM
I am having trouble wrapping my head around the relationship between being double-minded (v. 8) and a person who wavers (v. 6).  If I ask God for wisdom and don't have absolute faith that He will grant it to me, then I am wavering, don't have much faith.  The Bible commentary says that double-minded "describes the waverer of v. 6," and then says that the "mind is divided between the call of earthly pleasures and the call of unswerving loyalty to God."  I don't get the connection between that and having little faith.

The connection seems clear to  me.  The one who wavers, according to verse 6, is at the mercy of circumstances ("like a wave . . . driven with the wind").  His "faith" depends on circumstances.  This is why James says that he shouldn't expect anything from the Lord.  This person can't decide which way he is going.  This is not describing a new believer whose faith is still weak.  God honors the simple faith of the one who is taking steps toward Him.  But this verse is describing someone who seems to be more like Judas--double minded.  Or so it seems to me.
Title: Re: James chapter 1
Post by: Ed Sutton on October 24, 2009, 03:21:56 PM
What does jesus testify about double minded ?  So after looking at the two texts in Scripture i looked up "double minded" = 's 80 hits.

hit #  9 of 80

"Moses "was very meek, above all the men which were upon the face of the earth," and this is why he was granted divine wisdom and guidance above all others. Says the Scripture, "The meek will He guide in judgment: and the meek will He teach His way." Psalm 25:9. The meek are guided by the Lord, because they are teachable, willing to be instructed. They have a sincere desire to know and to do the will of God. The Saviour's promise is, "If any man will do His will, he shall know of the doctrine." John 7:17. And He declares by the apostle James, "If any of you lack wisdom, let him ask of God, that giveth to all men liberally, and upbraideth not; and it shall be given him." James 1:5. But His promise is only to those who are willing to follow the Lord wholly. God does not force the will of any; hence He cannot lead those who are too proud to be taught, who are bent upon having their own way. Of the double-minded man--he who seeks to follow his own will, while professing to do the will of God--it is written, "Let not that man think that he shall receive anything of the Lord." James 1:7.  {PP 384.2}



double mindedness - 1 facet = he who seeks to follow his own will, while professing to do the will of God.   ( plain english -  a hypocrite )


hit #  12

"1-3. Samuel's Sons Loved Reward.--Samuel had judged Israel from his youth. He had been a righteous and impartial judge, faithful in all his work. He was becoming old; and the people saw that his sons did not follow his footsteps. Although they were not vile, like the children of Eli, yet they were dishonest and double-minded. While they aided their father in his laborious work, their love of reward led them to favor the cause of the unrighteous   (1SP 353).  {2BC 1012.4}
        1-5. Samuel Was Deceived in His Sons.--These young men had received faithful instructions from their father, both by precept and example. They were not ignorant of the warnings given to Eli, and the divine judgments visited upon him and his house. They were apparently men of sterling virtue and integrity, as well as intellectual promise. It was with the full assent of the people that Samuel shared with his sons the responsibilities of office. But the characters of these young men were yet to be tested. Separated from their father's influence, it would be seen whether they were true to the principles which he had taught them. The result showed that Samuel had been painfully deceived in his sons. Like many young men of today who have been blessed with good abilities, they perverted their God-given powers. The honor bestowed upon them rendered them proud and self-sufficient. They did not make the glory of God their aim, nor did they seek earnestly to Him for strength and wisdom. Yielding to the power of temptation, they became avaricious, selfish, and unjust. God's Word declares that "they walked not in His ways, but turned aside after lucre, and took bribes, and perverted judgment" (ST Feb. 2, 1882).  {2BC 1012.5}




hit #  16 of 80  

"But let us read the remainder of the lesson given for our instruction, that we may more fully comprehend what it means to draw nigh to God. "Cleanse your hands, ye sinners; and purify your hearts, ye double minded." The work that is essential to be done by the sinner is here clearly defined. It is a work not agreeable to the inclination of the human heart; but unless it is done the soul is not in a condition to appreciate the purity and perfection of the character of Christ, and in no condition either to understand the offensiveness of sin. The exhortation is given, "Purify your hearts, ye double minded." While professing to be Christians, many have the mold of the world upon them, and their affections are not set upon God. They are double minded, making an attempt to serve God and mammon at the same time; but the world's Redeemer has declared, "Ye cannot serve God and mammon" (Matt. 6:24). By trying to serve two masters, they are unstable in all their ways, and cannot be depended upon.   To all appearances they are serving God, while at the same time in heart they are yielding to the temptation of Satan and cherishing sin. They may speak words that are smoother than oil, yet their hearts are full of deception and deceit in all their practices. Professing to be righteous, yet they have a heart that is desperately wicked.  {7BC 938.2}
     Of what profit is it to say pleasant things, to deplore the work of Satan, and yet at the same time to enter into the fulfillment of all his devices? This is being double minded   (Letter 13,1893).  {7BC 938.3}



Title: Re: James chapter 1
Post by: Richard OFfill on November 05, 2009, 05:00:34 PM
Just a general comment. Martin Luther didn't like the book of James. To him it was righteousness by works.

"Martin Luther, founder of the Protestant Reformation, referred to the book of James as an "epistle of straw." Frustrated by religious leaders who claimed this book supported their mistaken ideas that people could buy their salvation through monetary gifts to the church, Luther uttered his ill-advised phrase. Consumed in the debate, he went beyond a proper understanding of the Scriptures and dismissed James's statements that works are a necessary evidence of faith"

If you wish go to know-it-all Goggle and type in "Luther and the book of James" Interesting!
Title: Re: James chapter 1
Post by: Soli Deo Gloria on November 06, 2009, 03:03:29 AM
Just a general comment. Martin Luther didn't like the book of James. To him it was righteousness by works.

"Martin Luther, founder of the Protestant Reformation, referred to the book of James as an "epistle of straw." Frustrated by religious leaders who claimed this book supported their mistaken ideas that people could buy their salvation through monetary gifts to the church, Luther uttered his ill-advised phrase. Consumed in the debate, he went beyond a proper understanding of the Scriptures and dismissed James's statements that works are a necessary evidence of faith"

If you wish go to know-it-all Goggle and type in "Luther and the book of James" Interesting!

Luther later in his life repented of his position on the book of James.

Luther also made it clear in a quote where he said that "we are saved by faith alone, but the faith that saves is never alone".

A lot of Luther detractors like to say that he thought that works were not important, but the testimony of his life clearly says otherwise.

Luther was one of the most prolific writers of all time, as well as a great hymn writer. He worked diligently day and night translating the Bible from Latin into German. He clearly was a great man of God who did many wonderful works.

It is also clear that he was not perfect. He said many things he shouldn't have said. But don't we all?

Stan
Title: Re: James chapter 1
Post by: Ed Sutton on November 07, 2009, 05:07:52 PM
James is referring to believers actually having an internal experience corresponding to their profession of doctrine, that is lived out in constant works; showing their profession of faith to be genuine.

<1344>Justified does not always refer to cleansed from sin by atonement and mediation.   Sometimes the context shows that justified refers to evidence that demonstrates by actions the internally receiving the grace that vindicates and gives power to do right.


Mt 12:37  For by thy words thou shalt be justified <1344>, and by thy words thou shalt be condemned.

A person's words do not die on Calvary a vicarious death and rise to offer atonement and mediate, but a person's words demonstrate their internal experience and unity with God or Satan, and the heart work involved upon either side of that coin.

Ro 4:2  For if Abraham were justified <1344> by works, he hath whereof to glory; but not before God.

Ro 5:9  Much more then, being <1344> now justified <1344> by his blood, we shall be saved from wrath through him.
10  For if, when we were enemies, we were reconciled to God by the death of his Son, much more, being reconciled, we shall be saved by his life.
11  And not only so, but we also joy in God through our Lord Jesus Christ, by whom we have now received the atonement.

In Romans Paul refers to the atonement of Christ whereby a person is forgiven, cleansed, changed, and accounted vicariously righteous due to the perfect merits of Christ vicariously put in place of the sinners debt and defilement.   Paul is not giving context showcasing the demonstration of Abraham's internal experience of faith but rather that Abraham's circumcision could not atone for Abraham.  Only the death, raiseing of Christ, and Christ's perfect Life & atoning mediating for Abraham could save Abraham.   On that basis God's decision of mercy is extended unto salvation toward Abraham, not Abraham's circumcision or personal merits or personal works earning merits.

James is referring to believers actually having an internal experience corresponding to their profession of doctrine, that is lived out in constant works; showing their profession of faith to be genuine.  Evidence that can be pointed to, seen, evidence either for or against.

James 2
13  For he shall have judgment without mercy, that hath shewed no mercy; and mercy rejoiceth against judgment.
14
Title: Re: James chapter 1
Post by: Ed Sutton on November 07, 2009, 05:39:31 PM
If James had been contradicting Paul and said Abraham's works themselves saved Abraham, James would have attributed atonement justifying and righteousness spoken of by Paul unto Abraham's works to save Abraham.  Instead of saying "And the scripture was fulfilled which saith, Abraham believed God, and it was imputed unto him for righteousness: .  

Why would atoning righteousness before God be accounted from works - and - imputed ?   It would not - therefore the saving atoneing cleansing recreating forgiving righteousness comes from Christ alone - therefore is of necessity imputed.  Abraham's works could demonstrate, but not reconcile, save, cleanse, forgive, vicariously account innocent from existing perfection .  


The key in understanding Paul & James on justified <1344> is in examining what facets exist RE justify and the context.

Quote
As the sinner looks to the law, his guilt is made plain to him, and pressed home to his conscience, and he is condemned. His only comfort and hope is found in looking to the cross of Calvary. As he ventures upon the promises, taking God at His word, relief and peace come to his soul. He cries, "Lord, Thou hast promised to save all who come unto Thee in the name of Thy Son. I am a lost, helpless, hopeless soul. Lord, save, or I perish." His faith lays hold on Christ, and he is justified before God.  {1SM 365.3}
     But while God can be just, and yet justify the sinner through the merits of Christ, no man can cover his soul with the garments of Christ's righteousness while practicing known sins, or neglecting known duties. God requires the entire surrender of the heart, before justification can take place; and in order for man to retain justification, there must be continual obedience, through active, living faith that works by love and purifies the soul.  {1SM 366.1}
     James writes of Abraham and says, "Was not Abraham our father justified by works, when he had offered Isaac his son upon the altar? Seest thou how faith wrought with his works, and by works was faith made perfect? And the scripture was fulfilled which saith, Abraham believed God, and it was imputed unto him for righteousness: and he was called the Friend of God. Ye see then how that by works a man is justified, and not by faith only" (James 2:21-24). In order for man to be justified by faith, faith must reach a point where it will control the affections and impulses of the heart; and it is by obedience that faith itself is made perfect.  {1SM 366.2}
Title: Re: James chapter 1
Post by: Ed Sutton on November 07, 2009, 05:51:25 PM
Quote
Without the grace of Christ, the sinner is in a hopeless condition; nothing can be done for him; but through divine grace, supernatural power is imparted to the man, and works in mind and heart and character. It is through the impartation of the grace of Christ that sin is discerned in its hateful nature, and finally driven from the soul temple. It is through grace that we are brought into fellowship with Christ, to be associated with Him in the work of salvation. Faith is the condition upon which God has seen fit to promise pardon to sinners; not that there is any virtue in faith whereby salvation is merited, but because faith can lay hold of the merits of Christ, the remedy provided for sin. Faith can present Christ's perfect obedience instead of the sinner's transgression and defection. When the sinner believes that Christ is his personal Saviour, then, according to His unfailing promises, God pardons his sin, and justifies him freely. The repentant soul realizes that his justification comes because Christ, as his substitute and surety, has died for him, is his atonement and righteousness.  {1SM 366.3}

     "Abraham believed God, and it was counted unto him for righteousness. Now to him that worketh is the reward not reckoned of grace, but of debt. But to him that worketh not, but believeth on him that justifieth the ungodly, his faith is counted for righteousness" (Rom. 4:3-5). Righteousness is obedience to the law. The law demands righteousness, and this the sinner owes to the law; but he is incapable of rendering it. The only way in which he can attain to righteousness is through faith. By faith he can bring to God the merits of Christ, and the Lord places the obedience of His Son to the sinner's account. Christ's righteousness is accepted in place of man's failure, and God receives, pardons, justifies, the repentant, believing soul, treats him as though he were righteous, and loves him as He loves His Son. This is how faith is accounted righteousness; and the pardoned soul goes on from grace to grace, from light to a greater light. He can say with rejoicing, "Not by works of righteousness which we have done, but according to his mercy he saved us, by the washing of regeneration, and renewing of the Holy Ghost; which he shed on us abundantly through Jesus Christ our Saviour; that being justified by his grace, we should be made heirs according to the hope of eternal life" (Titus 3:5-7).  {1SM 367.1}