Revival Sermons

Theology => Justification => Topic started by: Richard OFfill on September 18, 2008, 06:15:53 AM

Title: Whats is the Root of the Problem?
Post by: Richard OFfill on September 18, 2008, 06:15:53 AM
As I travel it is not infrequent that in various churches there is often internal fighting and blatant worldliness. Does our church give sufficient emphasis on being born again. A member who was raised a Baptist was telling me that when he was young there were  revivals not once a year but often during the year. People were invited to come to the alter and give their hearts to Jesus.

I remember when we often had altar calls but they seem rare. What would happen if we did. It seems to me that many might stop coming to church. Yet many might begin to come who weren't there before. What would you do if you were a pastor or are?
Title: Re: Whats is the Root of the Problem?
Post by: Pamela Adams on September 18, 2008, 07:17:09 AM
If it is routine to preach pleasing to the ears sermons etc. altar calls are of no importance. However...if the preaching would change to dealing with the sin problem and the sin in our own lives....repent, repent, repent...for the kingdom of God is here....and the atmosphere of the church is solemn and sacred then the Holy Spirit can work upon our hearts bringing conviction of our need an altar call should be made.

We have to few altar calls....however, when a altar call is made...and those have come up...and the congregation is about to be dismissed...it is no time to tell the folks about the fellowship dinner.........
Title: Re: Whats is the Root of the Problem?
Post by: Larry Lyons on September 18, 2008, 10:36:18 AM
An altar call would not fit with a lot of sermons I hear. Sad to say, it would be a "non sequiter."
On the other side of the coin, the work of the Holy Spirit in a moving sermon can be cancelled out by a closing hymn that doesn't fit the occasion or one that is listlessly and boringly played and sung.  Or worse still, I have seen special music added at the end in place of the closing hymn.  That removes the attention from the message to the singer.

I remember one minister who said he never preached a sermon without giving an invitation for someone to surrender their heart to the Lord. It seems to me if the sermon is prompted by the Holy Spirit, an altar call would often be a natural thing to do. 
I think that inviting people to give praise and thanks and testimonies is another thing that is seldom done. It would be good to do that on a regular basis.
Title: Re: Whats is the Root of the Problem?
Post by: colporteur on September 18, 2008, 11:13:41 AM
I believe "conversion" should be a key topic in many of our sermons.

Many of our sermons rather than calling for an altar call are more in harmony with calling for people to come up and tap dance.
Title: Re: Whats is the Root of the Problem?
Post by: Raven on September 18, 2008, 02:29:10 PM

I think that inviting people to give praise and thanks and testimonies is another thing that is seldom done. It would be good to do that on a regular basis.

Our church has a time for that right before the pastoral prayer.  I think it is good, but sometimes, because it is done every Sabbath, some of the responses become generic and almost trite or trivial.  Is that time set aside for praise and thanksgiving a time to state the obvious?  "I'm thankful for the sunshine, and the flowers, etc."  I know this may sound cynical, and I'm not trying to be, because I know we are to be thankful at all times for all blessings.  But shouldn't the praise time a church be for special blessings that go above and beyond the "rain that falls on the just and the unjust?"  I'm not dogmatic on this, so I'm willing to see it from another point of view.
Title: Re: Whats is the Root of the Problem?
Post by: Larry Lyons on September 18, 2008, 03:16:46 PM
Our church has a time for that right before the pastoral prayer.  I think it is good, but sometimes, because it is done every Sabbath, some of the responses become generic and almost trite or trivial.  Is that time set aside for praise and thanksgiving a time to state the obvious?  "I'm thankful for the sunshine, and the flowers, etc."  I know this may sound cynical, and I'm not trying to be, because I know we are to be thankful at all times for all blessings.  But shouldn't the praise time a church be for special blessings that go above and beyond the "rain that falls on the just and the unjust?"  I'm not dogmatic on this, so I'm willing to see it from another point of view.
I think it would be a problem if it became just routine.  Also in small churches like the one I attend, many of these people are related and amost all of them have known each other since childhood, and they are up in their 70s and 80s.  Some of them went to academy together, and got married right after graduation. There are two married couples here like that. So they have already heard just about everything the others have ever had to say. However, having said that, if everyone was actually working in the vinyard, they/we would have no trouble having a fresh testimony and praise to give.
Title: Re: Whats is the Root of the Problem?
Post by: Raven on September 18, 2008, 05:00:10 PM
I think it would be a problem if it became just routine.  Also in small churches like the one I attend, many of these people are related and amost all of them have known each other since childhood, and they are up in their 70s and 80s.  Some of them went to academy together, and got married right after graduation. There are two married couples here like that. So they have already heard just about everything the others have ever had to say. However, having said that, if everyone was actually working in the vinyard, they/we would have no trouble having a fresh testimony and praise to give.

You have described our church fairly well, although most of the older ones have passed away.  And there are a few fresh testimonies from a faithful few.
Title: Re: Whats is the Root of the Problem?
Post by: Ed Sutton on December 06, 2008, 03:23:35 PM
Where do you get a bonfire from to warm up the folks near it (unconverted neighbours of the Church); from a huge wet pile of smoldering wood, or a slightly smaller pile of hotly burning wood ?

God will do next to nothing with people who think He is blase, and lots with people who are converted and singleminded to His glory. 

I view it as - how people relate to God = the spiritual  temprature of the Church members.

Them that realize being forgiven little - love God little.   Too much feeling of personal merits from claiming "the 28" and being "the frozen chosen", and not enough "Unto him that loved us, and washed us from our sins in his own blood".  - plus - "Truth that is not lived, that is not imparted, loses its life-giving power, its healing virtue. Its blessing can be retained only as it is shared.  {MH 148.4}"

The talents get removed and the candlesticks get moved out of their places.

"There is no need to marvel that the church is not vivified by the Holy Spirit's power. Men and women are setting aside the instruction Christ has given. Anger and covetousness are obtaining the victory. The soul-temple is full of wickedness. There is no room for Christ. Men follow their own perverse ways. They will not heed the words of the Saviour. They take themselves into their own hands, rejecting reproofs and warnings, until the candlestick is moved out of its place, and spiritual discernment is confused by human ideas. Though deficient in service, they justify themselves, saying, "The temple of the Lord, The temple of the Lord are we." They set the law of God aside to follow the light of their own imagination.  {RH, April 8, 1902 par. 10}

And what happens if a person's candlestick gets moved out of it's place ?

"God calls upon us to draw near to Him. As we do this we resist the devil, and he flees from us. Unless we follow on day by day to know the Lord, unless our faith increases, and holiness comes into the daily experience, we shall lose our first love. Its freshness and power will disappear. The candlestick will be moved out of its place.  {ST, September 18, 1901 par. 11}"

" 4 (Rev. 2:4, 5). A Candlestick Removed.--Did Solomon know God when he was doing according to the ways of idolaters?--No; he had forgotten the rich experience of his youth and the prayers he had made in the temple. [Rev. 2:4, 5 quoted.]  {2BC 1032.5}

     The candlestick was removed out of its place when Solomon forgot God. He lost the light of God, he lost the wisdom of God, he confounded idolatry with religion (RH March 29, 1892).  {2BC 1032.6}"

What was the light lost by removing the candlestick ?

Those who should have been the light of the world have shed forth but feeble and sickly beams. What is light? It is piety, goodness, truth, mercy, love; it is the revealing of the truth in the character and life. The gospel is dependent on the personal piety of its believers for its aggressive power, and God has made provision through the death of His beloved Son, that every soul may be thoroughly furnished unto every good work. Every soul is to be a bright and shining light, showing forth the praises of Him who has called us out of darkness into His marvelous light. "We are laborers together with God." Yes, laborers; that means doing earnest service in the vineyard of the Lord. There are souls to be saved,--souls in our churches, in our Sabbath schools, and in our neighborhoods.--Review and Herald, March 24, 1891.  {ChS 21.5}

     It is in working for others that they will keep their own souls alive. If they will become colaborers with Jesus, we shall see the light in our churches steadily burning brighter and brighter, sending forth its rays to penetrate the darkness beyond their own borders.--Historical Sketches, p. 291.  {ChS 22.1}

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Do a survey in Churches - and ask "how often this week did you feel and follow convictions to go out of your way to help and bless others ? "

The answers will show the hot - lukewarm - and the cold. 

"use it or Lose it" applies to more than the gym.